SERCAL 2017 Poster Presentations

SERCAL 2017 Poster Presentations

Restore, monitor, mitigate… Repeat? Adapting Habitat Restoration Projects for Climate Change

SERCAL 2017 Technical Session — Restore, monitor, mitigate… Repeat? Adapting Habitat Restoration Projects for Climate Change 

Looking Back at Early Restoration Projects: How have they fared the test of time?

SERCAL 2017 Technical Session — Looking Back at Early Restoration Projects: How have they fared the test of time?

Stream and Riparian Restoration

SERCAL 2017 Technical Session — Stream and Riparian Restoration

Technology and Innovations: Data Collection, Analysis, & Reporting

SERCAL 2017 Technical Session — Technology and Innovations: Data Collection, Analysis, & Reporting

Native Plant & Seed Sources: Challenges and Solutions in Plant Propagation and Seed Collection

SERCAL 2017 Technical Session — Native Plant & Seed Sources: Challenges and Solutions in Plant Propagation and Seed Collection  

San Luis Rey Flood Risk Management

This 7.2-mile stretch of riparian habitat is the project area of the San Luis Rey River Flood Risk Management Project. For years, this portion of the San Luis Rey River was overgrown with many invasive non-native plants like giant weed (Arundo donax), salt cedar (Tamarix sp.), and castor bean (Ricinus communis). The high abundance of these exotics diminished the quality of the habitat for the federally listed species and added to the dense vegetation that could lead to the increase of flood risk.

Active and Passive Vernal Pool Restoration Processes in an Urban Park

Since its inception in 1944, the Water Authority has aimed to secure a reliable water supply for San Diego County and has incorporated environmental programs and sustainability into its business model. The Water Authority is committed to restoring plant communities that are disturbed or impacted as a result of construction activities, and to conserve natural resources that surround their right-of-way and facilities throughout MTRP. 

Fusarium Dieback and its Shot Hole Borer Vectors Threaten Native Vegetation in California

In 2003, a single PSHB beetle was caught in a CDFA trap in Long Beach. The beetle went unnoticed until 2012 when it was found damaging backyard avocado and urban forest trees in the Los Angeles basin. A rapid monitoring response uncovered the broad host range of the pest-disease complex, but its ability to establish in native vegetation was only gradually recognized.